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Liquid animations so realistic you can almost taste them

Liquid animations so realistic you can almost taste them Professor Christopher Batty and his master's student Jade Marcoux-Ouellet watch a computer animation of honey coiling that he, Egor Larionov and Robert Bridson created.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo’s Cheriton School of Computer Science have developed a method of animating high-viscosity liquids. Achieving this milestone stems from the understanding that the pressure and viscosity forces that act on liquids need to be solved together for the computer animation to be physically accurate and visually stunning.

Read the full article on the University of Waterloo website

Sample Animations

By carefully coupling viscosity and pressure forces in a liquid, the research group's fluid animation can reproduce the classic liquid rope coiling of viscous liquids like honey.

By carefully coupling viscosity and pressure forces in a liquid, the research group’s fluid animation can reproduce the classic liquid rope coiling of viscous liquids like honey.

Collapsed piles of viscous armadillos. Left: The incorrect boundary conditions of the standard animation technique leads to rapid loss of surface detail. Right: The animation technique developed by Professor Batty's group with correct traction-free surfaces better preserves the fine details of the gooey armadillos.

Collapsed piles of viscous armadillos.
Left: The incorrect boundary conditions of the standard animation technique leads to rapid loss of surface detail. Right: The animation technique developed by Professor Batty’s group with correct traction-free surfaces better preserves the fine details of the gooey armadillos.

Their animation technique also captures the smooth buckling of a layer of caramel as it is poured onto a wafer.

Their animation technique also captures the smooth buckling of a layer of caramel as it is poured onto a wafer.

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