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Consider nominating a faculty member for the CACS/AIC Award for Lifetime Achievement in Computer Science

Call for Nominations

Award for Lifetime Achievement in Computer Science

2016

sponsored by

Canadian Association for Computer Science/Association informatique canadienne

CS-Can/Info-Can

http://cacsaic.org/

Nomination Deadline: December 1, 2016

Overview

The Canadian Association for Computer Science/Association informatique canadienne (CACS/AIC), the organization of Canadian academic computer science Departments, and its replacement organization CS-Can/Info-Can are offering an award for Lifetime Achievement in Computer Science. This award is made to faculty members in Canadian Computer Science Departments/Schools/Faculties who have made outstanding and sustained contributions to computing over their careers. The awards can be for achievement in research, teaching, service, or any combination of these.

There will be up to five awards per year. Winners will be invited to attend the annual Awards Banquet to receive their awards.

Eligibility

A candidate for this award must have held a full time appointment in a Computer Science Department1 at a Canadian University for at least 10 years and must have spent the majority of their academic career in Canada. Candidates need not be currently active faculty members, nor even still living.

Selection Committee

The selection committee is a Panel of computer scientists from a variety of subdisciplines of the field, so all nomination material should be written appropriately for such an audience. This panel is appointed by CACS/AIC and CS-Can/Info-Can.

Nomination Procedures

Candidates cannot apply on their own behalf, but must be nominated by a member of the Canadian computer science academic community who has first hand knowledge of the nominee’s contributions. All submissions should be packaged into a single PDF file.

“Computer Science Department” is a broad term that includes Canadian Departments, Schools, and Faculties of Computer Science, however named. Similarly, the term “Chair” refers to the Chair or Head of the Department, the Director of the School, or the Dean of the Faculty of Computer Science, whichever is appropriate.

The Nomination Package

The nomination package should include the following:

a summary (up to 1 page) for public consumption outlining the candidate’s contributions in everyday language.

a nomination statement (up to 3 pages) that explains why the candidate deserves consideration for the award. This nomination statement should make the case for the nomination, indicating the category or categories in which the candidate has made their contribution and explaining the nature of the contributions they have made.

curriculum vitae (no page limit) of the candidate, focused on the candidate’s contributions in the category or categories for which they are being nominated.

3-5 letters of support for the candidate from other people who have first hand knowledge of the candidate’s contributions in the appropriate category or categories. Such letters can be written by colleagues in the same Department or other Departments in Canada or outside of Canada, or by other people who can appraise the contributions, for example former students for a teaching contribution, or somebody in the computing industry for a research contribution who knows the impact of a candidate’s research.

other supporting material, up to a limit of 5 pages, that will contribute to an understanding of the candidate’s contributions.

No other material (letters of support, etc.) can be included in the nomination package.

Notification

Successful candidates will be notified by February 1, 2017. The awards will be presented at a ceremony to be held in conjunction with the annual Computer Science Chairs meeting in 2017, usually held in late May. Successful candidates will be provided with funds to help defray the costs to attend this ceremony in order to receive the award in person.

How to Submit

The nomination should be put into a single PDF file, which should be e-mailed as an attachment to the Computer Science Awards Panel, c/o Gord McCalla, at mccalla@cs.usask.ca.

crowded-mic

Call for Nominations – Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prizes

Call for Nominations

Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prizes

2016

sponsored by

Canadian Association for Computer Science/Association informatique canadienne

CS-Can/Info-Can

http://cacsaic.org/

Nomination Deadline: February 1, 2017

Overview

The Canadian Association for Computer Science/Association informatique canadienne (CACS/AIC), the organization of Canadian academic computer science Departments, and its replacement organization CS-Can/Info-Can are offering up to three annual prizes to top young computer science academic researchers within 10 years of finishing their Ph.D.

These awards recognize excellence in research. Each prize is worth $1000.

Eligibility

A candidate for these prizes must hold a full time appointment in the Computer Science Department1 of a Canadian University, must have finished their Ph.D. no earlier than July 1, 2006, and cannot have already been awarded the CACS/AIC Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher prize. Note: parental leave taken for child bearing and rearing, or medical leave, is not counted as part of the 10 year period; in such situations appropriate evidence should be supplied by the nominator or the Chair.

Selection Committee

The selection committee is a Panel of computer scientists from a variety of sub-disciplines of the field, so all nomination material should be written appropriately for such an audience. This panel is appointed by CACS/AIC and CS-Can/Info-Can.

Nomination Procedures

Candidates cannot apply on their own behalf, but must be nominated by a member of the Canadian computer science academic community. The nomination must be endorsed by the Computer Science Department Chair at the candidate's university. All submissions should be fully electronic in a generally accessible format such as PDF.

“Computer Science Department” is a broad term that includes Canadian Departments, Schools, and Faculties of Computer Science, however named. Similarly, the term “Chair” refers to the Chair or Head of the Department, the Director of the School, or the Dean of the Faculty of Computer Science, whichever is appropriate.

The nominator provides

  • a description of the nominator (one paragraph) that fully identifies the nominator (including postal and e-mail address) and briefly outlines the nominator’s relationship to the candidate and to the candidate’s area(s) of research specialization;
  • a 2-page nomination that explains why the candidate deserves consideration for the prize, with emphasis on contributions to, and impact on, their field(s) of research;
  • an abstract (one paragraph) for public consumption outlining the candidate’s accomplishments, to be used both in committee deliberations and for publicity if the candidate wins a prize;
  • endorsements, letters solicited from 3 internationally recognized experts in the candidate’s field(s), but at arm’s length from the candidate, that discuss the impact of the candidate’s research on his or her research community.

The Chair of the candidate’s Department provides a two-page letter endorsing the nomination that

  • briefly overviews the candidate’s research area and contributions to research;
  • also provides a broader context for the candidate’s activities, including their teaching and administrative responsibilities; their role in supervisory and advisory committees; their involvement in outreach to others in the Department, University, industry, and the community; and their actual or demonstrated capacity for leadership;
  • indicates any parental leave or medical leave that may affect the eligibility dates for the prize, if appropriate.

The candidate provides

  • a two-page 3 summary of their research contributions and the impact of this research;
  • a one-page summary of their planned future directions for research;
  • a full curriculum vitae (no page limits);
  • web-accessible links to the candidate’s three most significant research contributions (or paper or PDF copies if issues such as copyright make it impossible to set up a web link).

No other material (letters of support, etc.) can be included in the review process.

Notification

Successful candidates will be notified by March 15, 2017. The prizes will be presented at a ceremony to be held in conjunction with the annual Computer Science Chairs meeting in 2016, usually held in late May. Successful candidates will be provided with funds to help defray the costs of attending this ceremony in order to receive the prize in person.

How to Submit

The nominator is responsible for gathering all the material, putting it into a single PDF file, and e-mailing the file as an attachment to the Computer Science Awards Panel, c/o Gord McCalla, at mccalla@cs.usask.ca.

If the Department Chair is himself or herself a candidate for a prize, then another responsible member of the Department should provide the information requested of the Chair.

In all cases the page limits are, of course, upper limits.

professor

See the research contributions of the 2015 Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize Winners

CACS/AIC Outstanding Young Canadian Computer Science Researcher Prizes

The Canadian Association of Computer Science/Association informatique Canadienne is pleased to announce the winners of the Outstanding Young Canadian Computer Science Researcher Prize for 2015.

Canadian Association of Computer Science
Association informatique canadienne

Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize – 2015

Kate Larson
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science
University of Waterloo

Kate Larson’s research is in multi-agent systems, a subfield of artificial intelligence that brings together computer science, mathematics, and economics. Kate is an outstanding researcher and in recognition of this Kate recently was awarded a prestigious Province of Ontario Early Researcher Award. To get a flavor of her research, consider the following (the work was done in collaboration with Georgia Kastidou and Robin Cohen). In e-commerce and online communities such as Amazon.com and TripAdvisor.com, a very useful feature is the ratings and recommendations of other participants.

Over time, participants build up reputations within an online community for being more or less reliable. But a problem is that a reputation for reliability or usefulness in one community, such as Amazon.com, cannot be transferred to another community, such as TripAdvisor.com. Kate’s research addresses this problem by proposing a framework so that communities can exchange reputation information. A notable property of the framework is that honesty really is the best policy in this framework. Using Kate’s proposed framework, each online community is strengthened and benefited and individual participants themselves have an incentive to be better community citizens.

Kate is also remarkable for her service orientation and her commitment to giving back to her community. Of particular note are her positions of leadership in the scientific community—she is currently president of IFAAMAS, the community of multi-agent researchers, and a Councilor for AAAI, the association of artificial intelligence researchers—and her work on outreach. In outreach, Kate has been active in organizing and speaking at events for female high school and university students to help ensure that young women see computer science as a career option. In summary, Kate combines excellence as a researcher with leadership in the scientific community and a commitment to the wider discipline of computer science.

Zongpeng Li
Department of Computer Science
University of Calgary

Dr. Zongpeng Li is a world-leading expert in Network Coding, which is a relatively recent innovation (about 15 years old) in theoretical networking research. Network coding combines ideas from Information Theory with those from Computer Science and Computer Networks. A primary focus is on determining the maximum possible throughput that is possible for information flows across general data networks.

Unlike current networks, where nodes simply forward data packets passively towards their destination, network coding allows data flows to be actively sliced, diced, and mixed at arbitrary nodes within the network. With proper design, this approach can exploit multiple parallel data pathways to increase the end-to-end information-carrying capacity of the network.

Zongpeng has contributed enormously to the theoretical underpinnings of network coding research, including fundamental results that highlight both its strengths and limitations. His work has broad applicability to the design of next-generation information networks, particularly for supporting big data transfers using state-of-the-art communication technologies.

Regan Mandryk
Department of Computer Science
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Regan Mandryk is one of Canada’s top researchers in Human-Computer Interaction, particularly in the areas of game research and affective computing. She is an extremely productive scholar with more than 100 publications, and both she and her work have received numerous awards. Dr. Mandryk and her students have made several important contributions to knowledge, all of which have had substantial impact on the research community.

For example, Dr. Mandryk developed the first models of emotional response in computer games, which enable games to adapt themselves to the player’s emotional state; she invented new techniques for player balancing that allow people of widely different skill levels to play together in competitive games; and she developed new techniques for persuasive computing that have been applied in a range of systems – from helping people make healthy food choices, to helping children with FASD improve their ability to concentrate.

Dr. Mandryk’s research program is innovative and highly collaborative, provides expert training for a large number of students and other highly qualified personnel, and has attracted substantial interest from several industrial partners.

clapping

CACS/AIC is pleased to announce the winners of the Outstanding Young Canadian Computer Science Researcher Prize 2015

CACS/AIC Outstanding Young Canadian Computer Science Researcher Prizes

The Canadian Association of Computer Science/Association informatique Canadienne is pleased to announce the winners of the Outstanding Young Canadian Computer Science Researcher Prize for 2015.

Canadian Association of Computer Science
Association informatique canadienne

Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize – 2015

Kate Larson
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science
University of Waterloo

Kate Larson’s research is in multi-agent systems, a subfield of artificial intelligence that brings together computer science, mathematics, and economics. Kate is an outstanding researcher and in recognition of this Kate recently was awarded a prestigious Province of Ontario Early Researcher Award. To get a flavor of her research, consider the following (the work was done in collaboration with Georgia Kastidou and Robin Cohen). In e-commerce and online communities such as Amazon.com and TripAdvisor.com, a very useful feature is the ratings and recommendations of other participants.

Over time, participants build up reputations within an online community for being more or less reliable. But a problem is that a reputation for reliability or usefulness in one community, such as Amazon.com, cannot be transferred to another community, such as TripAdvisor.com. Kate’s research addresses this problem by proposing a framework so that communities can exchange reputation information. A notable property of the framework is that honesty really is the best policy in this framework. Using Kate’s proposed framework, each online community is strengthened and benefited and individual participants themselves have an incentive to be better community citizens.

Kate is also remarkable for her service orientation and her commitment to giving back to her community. Of particular note are her positions of leadership in the scientific community—she is currently president of IFAAMAS, the community of multi-agent researchers, and a Councilor for AAAI, the association of artificial intelligence researchers—and her work on outreach. In outreach, Kate has been active in organizing and speaking at events for female high school and university students to help ensure that young women see computer science as a career option. In summary, Kate combines excellence as a researcher with leadership in the scientific community and a commitment to the wider discipline of computer science.

Zongpeng Li
Department of Computer Science
University of Calgary

Dr. Zongpeng Li is a world-leading expert in Network Coding, which is a relatively recent innovation (about 15 years old) in theoretical networking research. Network coding combines ideas from Information Theory with those from Computer Science and Computer Networks. A primary focus is on determining the maximum possible throughput that is possible for information flows across general data networks.

Unlike current networks, where nodes simply forward data packets passively towards their destination, network coding allows data flows to be actively sliced, diced, and mixed at arbitrary nodes within the network. With proper design, this approach can exploit multiple parallel data pathways to increase the end-to-end information-carrying capacity of the network.

Zongpeng has contributed enormously to the theoretical underpinnings of network coding research, including fundamental results that highlight both its strengths and limitations. His work has broad applicability to the design of next-generation information networks, particularly for supporting big data transfers using state-of-the-art communication technologies.

Regan Mandryk
Department of Computer Science
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Regan Mandryk is one of Canada’s top researchers in Human-Computer Interaction, particularly in the areas of game research and affective computing. She is an extremely productive scholar with more than 100 publications, and both she and her work have received numerous awards. Dr. Mandryk and her students have made several important contributions to knowledge, all of which have had substantial impact on the research community.

For example, Dr. Mandryk developed the first models of emotional response in computer games, which enable games to adapt themselves to the player’s emotional state; she invented new techniques for player balancing that allow people of widely different skill levels to play together in competitive games; and she developed new techniques for persuasive computing that have been applied in a range of systems – from helping people make healthy food choices, to helping children with FASD improve their ability to concentrate.

Dr. Mandryk’s research program is innovative and highly collaborative, provides expert training for a large number of students and other highly qualified personnel, and has attracted substantial interest from several industrial partners.

engagement

CACS/AIC is proud to announce the 2015 winners of the Lifetime Achievement Awards in Computer Science

Awards for Lifetime Achievement in Computer Science – 2015

The CACS/AIC Awards committee has chosen this year's winners of the Lifetime Achievement in Computer Science Awards:

  • Nick Cercone, York
  • Steve Cook, Toronto
  • Derek Corneil, Toronto
  • Alan George, Waterloo
  • Tom Hull, Toronto
  • Frank Tompa, Waterloo

The awards will be made at the banquet at this year's CS Chairs meeting in Montréal, May 26-27.

conference

View details of Computer Science Canada (CS-CAN) / Informatique Canada (Info-CAN): A Proposal

Computer Science Canada (CS-CAN) / Informatique Canada (Info-CAN) - A Proposal

Introduction

Canada lacks a national computer science organization that represents all aspects of computer science and effectively represents the interests of the discipline at the national level. In May 2015 CACS/AIC and the NSERC CS Liaison committee agreed to establish a working group to develop a proposal for such an organization. This working group has been active since September 2015. This document summarizes the proposal for the new organization that is currently under development.

Background

Academic computer science is largely underrepresented at the national level and our story is largely untold. We don’t have the same lobbying presence in Ottawa as other scientific disciplines and we have often found ourselves at a disadvantage when it comes to funding. Yet we have a number of world class research departments and many smaller departments that more then pull their weight in research and the training of highly qualified personnel. In addition, we need to convince the public that computer science is more than a viable career path and address the gender imbalance in our departments. This cannot be done by individual departments on their own or by groups representing individual sub-disciplines. Instead, we need a single organization that provides a unified voice for computer science and can advance our causes at the national level.

One of our main challenges is producing an organization that represents the breadth of departments that we have in Canada and the wide range of activities they undertake. The organization must have a strong voice on research and at the same time advocate for the role that we play in the development of talent for the IT industry. We need to reach out to high schools to encourage students to enroll in our programs and communicate the rich history of our field and the contributions that we have made to the development of computer science. The new organization must encompass all the activities of our departments and cannot concentrate on a single aspect of them.

The New Organization

The proposed name of the new organization is Computer Science Canada (CS-CAN) / Informatique Canada (Info-CAN). This name has already been registered and appropriate domains names have been secured. The mission statement for the new organization is:

The mission is to foster excellence in Computer Science research and higher education in Canada, drive innovation and benefit society.

The roles played by the new organization include, but are not limited to:

  • Advocate for Computer Science within Canada
    • Research funding 2
    • CS education
    • Public policy
  • Promote Computer Science
    • Awards
    • Undergraduate and graduate recruiting
  • Connect with Industry
    • Research speed dating

These roles will evolve as the organization becomes established and the interests of its members is determined.

Membership

There are four classes of membership:

  • Department – Includes all the faculty members in the department along with its students. Individual – All the individual faculty members in the Department members in addition to faculty in related disciplines whose departments are not members of the organization.
  • Student – Student in computer science or a related field.
  • Industry – Individuals from industry who support the goals of the organization.

The department membership class mirrors the membership structure of CRA where membership is at the departmental level. It is assumed that most of the individual and student members will come in through a departmental membership and not through individual application. The addition of a separate individual membership class allows for faculty members in related disciplines to join the organization. This will be attractive to faculty members supported by the NSERC CS committee who are not in a computer science department.

We think it is important to have student involved in the organization early in their careers. They will be encouraged to join the organization as student members and they will have a position of the organization’s board. Similarly, the industry membership class encourages industrial participation in the organization. This membership class is also open to individuals in government departments and research laboratories.

Organization

The activities of the new organization is governed by an elected board, an executive and a number of standing committees. The composition of the board includes:

  • One student elected by the student members of the organization.
  • One industry member elected by the industry members of the organization.
  • X individual members elected by the department members, with one vote per department.
  • Y individual members elected by the individual members with the condition that Y ≥ 2X

The board constitution attempts to balance the representation of the small and large departments. If all the board members were directly elected by the individual members there is the possibility that the larger departments will dominate the board. To counter this a number of the board 3 members are elected on the basis of one vote per department, treating all departments the same regardless of size.

Board members are elected for a three year term and approximately one third of the board positions will be up for election each term. A board member can serve for two consecutive terms, after which they must be off the board for three years before they can be elected again. A nominations committee will be responsible for soliciting and recruiting a slate of nominees for each election. The nominations committee will attempt to maintain a balance on the board with respect to department size, region, gender and PhD vs. non-PhD granting departments, so the board is representative of the organization’s membership.

  • The executive consists of the following members:
  • President – directly elected by the individual members.
  • Vice-President – selected from the board members.
  • Treasurer – selected from the board members.
  • Secretary – selected from the board members.
  • Immediate Past President – automatic after the election of a new president

The executive members have the same term constraints as the board members.

The initial set of standing committees for the organization are:

  • Advocacy Committee
  • Awards Committee
  • Communications Committee
  • Departmental Affairs
  • Diversity Committee
  • Education Committee
  • Nominations Committee
  • NSERC Interaction Committee
  • Outreach Committee
  • Research Committee

It is assumed that board members will be actively involved in these committees either as the committee chair or co-chair. Committee membership is open to all members of the organization and the committee chair will be tasked with recruiting members and reporting the committee membership to the board. The department affairs committee will be responsible for the annual department heads meeting, which will be a continuation of as this aspect of CACS/AIC activities.

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View details of the Town Hall Agenda

CS-Can/Info-Can: Formation of a National Computer Science Association

Town Hall Agenda

Webcast: http://livestream.com/itmsstudio/events/4609696

Question Email: cscanada@uwaterloo.ca

12:00 Lunch (DC 1301) Hosted by University of Waterloo

1:00

  • Introduction Purpose of town hall
  • History
  • Brief introduction to CS-Can/Info-Can
  • Elizabeth Boston - NSERC

1:20 Panel Session – The Role of a National Academic Association

  • Bobby Schnabel – ACM
  • Richard MacKenzie – Canadian Association of Physicists
  • Susan Davidson - CRA

1:50 CS-Can/Info-Can Proposal

2:10 Discussion

Speaker Biographies

Robert (Bobby) Schnabel chairs ACM's Education Policy Committee, is an ACM Fellow and was recently appointed as Executive Director and CEO of ACM. He is co-founder and a member of the executive team of the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT), and is active in a number of committees and boards regarding computing education and research and minority-serving institutions. A recipient of numerous teaching and professional awards, Schnabel is Professor of Computer Science and Informatics, and Dean of the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University. Previously, he was Vice Provost/Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Campus Technology and Professor of Computer Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His research and teaching interests include numerical computation, parallel computation, applications to molecular chemistry, and diversifying participation in computing and information technology, both in education and in workforce development. Schnabel earned his Doctorate and Master's degrees in Computer Science from Cornell University and his undergraduate degree in Mathematics from Dartmouth College.

Richard MacKenzie, Canadian Association of Physicists, Université de Montréal

Richard MacKenzie earned his Bachelor’s degree in Engineering Science (physics option) from the University of Toronto in 1980. He obtained his PhD in Physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1984. He remained there for a post-doc for one year, and following postdocs at DAMTP, Cambridge University, and at Ohio State University, he joined the faculty of the Département de physique of the Université de Montréal in 1989. His main research area is theoretical particle physics, studying classical solutions of field theories and their quantum descendants. His work has touched upon applications in a variety of fields, including particle physics, condensed matter physics and cosmology. More recently, he has also worked in the field of quantum information. Richard has taught a dozen courses over the years, at all levels of the undergraduate and graduate curricula. He has won his Department’s teaching award on five occasions, as well as that of the Faculté des arts et des sciences of the Université de Montréal in 2012. He has been a member of CAP since 1994, and has served as chair of the Division of Theoretical Physics and as regional councillor for Quebec North and West. He has been co-organizer of several Theory Canada conferences, and was co-chair of the Local Organizing Committee of the 2013 CAP congress held at the Université de Montréal.

Dr. Susan B. Davidson, professor of computer and information science for the School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Pennsylvania, and is the George A. Weiss Professor of Computer and Information Science. She is Chair of the Board of Directors, CRA. Dr. Davidson received her bachelor's degree in mathematics from Cornell University and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University in 1980 and 1982. She joined the faculty of Penn Engineering in the Department of Computer and Information Science in 1982. Dr. Davidson's research interests include database and web-based systems, and bioinformatics. Within bioinformatics she is best known for her work with the Kleisli data integration system, with Drs. Peter Buneman, Val Tannen and Christopher Overton, which was subsequently commercialized in the company GeneticXChange. Her more recent work has centered on XML technologies for data sharing and data integration.